Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Newsroom

Counter-Drone Technology to be Commercialized by Embry-Riddle and Drone Defense Systems LLC

New technology that detects and commandeers unauthorized drones, guiding them to land safely, will be commercialized under a licensing agreement between Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Drone Defense Systems LLC of Daytona Beach, Fla.
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Featured News

Aiming to make air travel safer, a 21-year-old Embry-Riddle Worldwide student is helping the Federal Aviation Administration streamline and update part of the system pilots use for navigation.  Samridh Sood, a sophomore in the Aeronautics program, worked with Michael Watkins, a senior representative for the FAA in Southeast Asia, Embry-Riddle Assistant Professor and Academic Development Officer Dr. Jack Patel, and Interim Vice-Chancellor and Head of Asia Matthew Flaherty to address the issue of navigation waypoints that have the duplicate names. Airplanes today use GPS to navigate from place to place, but the routes are seldom direct. Instead, pilots use a series of waypoints defined by their geographic coordinates and given names, usually capitalized five-letter words, such as PLGRM – which is near Boston – and TWAIN, which is above the famous writer’s birthplace in Missouri.
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Mission accomplished! Composed of seven Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University engineering students, Team Tiber Designs has successfully fired the Prescott campus’ first liquid rocket engine inside a brand new test facility as part of their senior capstone project in the College of Engineering. The project was named Janus and Testcell 3.
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News Briefs

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An analysis of records regarding Florida children in foster care between 2010 and 2017, completed at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, suggests a new way to inform decisions about child welfare services.
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In keeping with Embry-Riddle’s intense focus on aviation safety, Embry-Riddle students and faculty at a recent high-level conference highlighted the importance of structured protocols to improve patient healthcare. “In the world of aviation, clear communication and procedural discipline are critical to safety,” said Joseph R. Keebler, associate professor of Human Factors and Behavioral Neurobiology. “Our research applies those same values to help reduce risks in hospital settings, particularly in patient handoff situations.” The goal of the research is to inform best practices in hospitals as well as military medical facilities.
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On July 2, 2019, the Moon will block the Sun, treating viewers in South America to a total solar eclipse. Embry-Riddle’s Dr. Alan Liu will witness the spectacle from the Andes LIDAR Observatory in Cerro Pachón, Chile. He hopes to learn how the eclipse affects a super-cold region of the atmosphere called the mesosphere. Understanding disruptions of solar radiation in the mesosphere during the eclipse will help improve global circulation models, space weather prediction and global satellite navigation systems, said Liu, professor of Engineering Physics. With the totality of the upcoming solar eclipse passing directly over the Andes LIDAR Observatory in South America, Embry-Riddle researchers will have a unique opportunity to explore fundamental science questions, thanks to Liu’s founding role in establishing the observatory. “A solar eclipse shuts off heat and radiation to the atmosphere and it creates disturbances from the ground, all the way to the upper atmosphere,” Liu explained. “The effects of these disturbances last many hours after the sun’s shadow passes by.”
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An Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University effort to advance innovation in Florida recently provided $18,000 to a trio of aspiring entrepreneurs during the 2019 Launch Your Venture competition, sponsored by Boeing HorizonX and the International Speedway Corporation (ISC). The statewide competition, organized in partnership with Embry-Riddle’s Center for Entrepreneurship, focused on disruptive technologies that could transform the aviation, aerospace and engineering industries. Finalists presented their pitches on April 19 at the John Mica Engineering and Aerospace Innovation Complex (MicaPlex) in Embry-Riddle’s Research Park.
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As Embry-Riddle President Dr. P Barry Butler welcomed Undersecretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly as the keynote speaker of the just concluded President’s Forum on Research and Innovation, he noted that the symposium’s focus on aero-cybersecurity was a signature area for Embry-Riddle because of its critical importance to national interests, the industry and public safety.   Modly, chief management and information officer for the U.S. Navy, echoed the importance of the topic in speaking about the unique challenges of preparing the largest naval force in the world for rapid technological advances while rebuilding a maritime force that must be adaptable and trained to anticipate new threats, even as existing threats evolve. He said cyber espionage is of significant concern and everything from ships and aircraft to weapon systems must be protected from ever increasing and ever more sophisticated cyber attacks.
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Senior Mechanical Engineering students Andrew Ferree and Zack Saidman want to make the streets safer, and they believe they’ve figured out a way to accomplish that goal for a grand total of 23 dollars. That is the cost of the prototype they designed which won them second place at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) International’s Connected Vehicle Challenge 2019, on April 11. The device, which would become even cheaper to manufacture once production levels grow beyond the duo’s initial 1,000-unit projection, is meant to “talk” through radio signals to nearby devices mounted on bicycles and attached to pedestrians, warning of upcoming hazards to prevent collisions — an occurrence, the students learned, is even more common than they imagined. “Our most interesting discovery was how many cyclists are injured each year by vehicles: 45,000 injuries and 840 deaths,” Ferree said. “And 5,000 of the injuries are to children 14 and younger. It’s pretty insane.”
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