Pilot and Award-Winning Journalist Miles O’Brien to Students: `Share Your Enthusiasm’

Miles O’Brien, a third-generation, instrument-rated general aviation pilot and award-winning PBS correspondent specializing in science, technology, aerospace and environmental reporting, this week urged Embry-Riddle student-engineers to communicate their work and why it’s important to society.
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Featured News

To succeed in engineering or any other field, artist and retired astronaut Nicole Stott encourages girls and young women to “live what you love, look for role models, and focus on helping others.” Stott – a member of the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Board of Trustees since 2012 – was the only female in her senior advanced engineering design class at Embry-Riddle, where she received an aeronautical engineering degree in 1987. Yet, she said, “I never noticed that I was the only woman in the class because I was studying something I loved to do, and all those around me were studying something they loved to do as well.” 
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“Aviation is a global enterprise and does not happen in a bubble immune from cultural differences, miscommunication and the challenges created by inadequate aviation English skills.” —  Embry-Riddle Assistant Professor Elizabeth Mathews
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News Briefs

Outtakes

Soon you will see a new, bright light in the night sky. However, it is not a star or even a plane. According to Popular Mechanics, it’s a satellite sent to orbit by New Zealand company Rocket Lab. The small satellite, called the Humanity Star, is a carbon fibre, geodesic sphere made of 65 highly reflective panels. As it orbits, the Humanity Star spins rapidly and reflects sunlight back to Earth. Rocket Lab Founder and CEO Peter Beck hopes this satellite will encourage people to consider their place in the universe and reflect on their lives and humanity as a species. “Seldom do we as a species stop, look to the stars and realize our position in the universe as an achingly tiny speck of dust in the grandness of it all,” said Beck in a statement on the Humanity Star website. “Humanity is finite, and we won't be here forever. Yet in the face of this almost inconceivable insignificance, humanity is capable of great and kind things when we recognize we are one species, responsible for the care of each other, and our planet, together. The Humanity Star is to remind us of this.” The Humanity Star is best visible to the United States in March, so make sure to keep a look out. You can also track the Humanity Star to find out when it is most visible for your location. However, don’t wait too long. The Humanity Star will only orbit the earth for nine months, before it falls back to earth and burns up upon re-entry into the atmosphere.
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Earlier this month, more than 165,000 attendees visited the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Each year, this unique conference unveils some of the most brilliant, innovative technology, along with a collection of outlandish products. Check out Digital Trends’ look at the wackiest gadgets from CES 2018. Some of our favorites include the PowerDolphin water drone, Aibo robot dog, a flying-selfie phone case, and a robot that folds your clothes.
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According to a recent Popular Mechanics report, the Russian space agency has plans for an out-of-this-world tourism opportunity in 2022. Once complete, guests can stay in a luxury orbital suite at the International Space Station (ISS). The planned hotel spans approximately 50 feet and offers private cabins, bathroom facilities, exercise equipment and Wi-Fi. The trip also features a hefty price tag of $40 million per person for a one- to two-week trip. Space travelers will have the opportunity to splurge for an additional spacewalk accompanied by a professional cosmonaut or an extended month-long stay. The ISS is scheduled to retire in 2028, limiting this space tourism opportunity to a maximum of six years.   Space tourism is certainly on the horizon, with companies like Virgin Galactic and SpaceX also pursuing to blast customers into the cosmos. However, if you are interested in one of these astounding experiences, you may want to start saving now.
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Thanks to General Motors, getting your coffee fix just got a little easier. This month, the automotive retailer launched its Marketplace technology, which allows drivers to order food, reserve a table at a restaurant and locate nearby gas stations from their car’s in-vehicle touchscreen. The platform also affords users other expediencies such as paying for gas from the car, finding and paying for parking, and much more. With major brands like Applebee’s, Dunkin Donuts, Starbucks, Shell, TGI Fridays and Wingstop already on board, Marketplace offers increasing convenience at the touch of button. “The average American spends 46 minutes per day on the road driving. Leveraging connectivity and our unique data capabilities, we have an opportunity to make every trip more productive and give our customers time back,” said Santiago Chamorro, vice president for Global Connected Customer Experience, GM. “Marketplace is the first of a suite of new personalization features that we will roll out over the next 12 to 18 months to nearly four million U.S. drivers.” Marketplace is designed for use while driving and is available in Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac vehicles with compatible infotainment systems. The platform utilizes the car’s embedded 4G LTE connectivity and does not require a separate data plan.
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More Headlines

When Zandile “Pepe” Sibandze was growing up in Swaziland, a small country in Southern Africa between Mozambique and South Africa, she knew from a very young age that she wanted to be a pilot. While her sisters played with dolls, Sibandze dreamed of owning an airplane toy. 
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Rebecca DeMarco, who founded Daytona Beach Campus’s Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Women in Engineering Student Affinity Group, is a Human Factors Engineer for Honeywell Aerospace 
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In February 1993, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University was one of the first non-profit, accredited institutes of higher education to break ground on a then-emerging technology that now encompasses more than 30 percent of college students. 
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Profiles

Graduating with his business degrees from Embry-Riddle, standout student athlete Jason Alvarez knows what it takes to succeed. As a Procurement Agent and Supplier Integration leader for The Boeing Company, Jason travels the globe meeting with seat suppliers to ensure Boeing delivers the best products and services to their airline customers. He also offers some advice to current and prospective business students.
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Dr. Jason M. Ruckert, Vice Chancellor of Online Education at Embry-Riddle Worldwide, has been appointed to distinguished leadership positions with two national organizations focused on shaping the future of online higher education. Earlier this month, Ruckert was named vice chair of the WCET Steering Committee. WCET is the leader in the practice, policy and advocacy of technology-enhanced learning in higher education. This summer, Ruckert was appointed to UPCEA’s National Council for Online Education Advisory Board. The national council is the first of its kind and focuses on leadership; strategy; financial models; marketing and program development; student services; and effective partnerships within online education. “Both national boards have plans to do some pretty amazing things in the future, and the institutions represented are certainly those that plan to be on the cutting edge of online education. My goal is to ensure Embry-Riddle is always synonymous with world-class online education" Ruckert said.
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Alexandria Dwyer was able to combine her passion for aviation, international relations and security to become the first graduate of Embry-Riddle Worldwide’s Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies.
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