News Briefs

Embry-Riddle and City of Prescott dignitaries gathered alongside students, faculty, and staff to celebrate the official opening of the western campus’ newest residential hall, Thumb Butte Suites. The ceremonial ribbon cutting coincides with the annual OctoberWest celebration, made all the more special as the University commemorates its 40th anniversary in Arizona this year.
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Three Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University students have been awarded the first Women in Aviation scholarships from Raytheon Company’s Intelligence, Information and Services business.
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Dr. Remzi Seker, director of the Cybersecurity and Assured Systems Engineering (CyBASE) Center, professor of Computer Science and an accomplished scholar in the field of cybersecurity has accepted the position of Embry-Riddle Research Fellow.
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In February 2018, a YouTube video revealed a small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) taking off from a parking lot and climbing more than 1,000 feet as a passenger jet came dangerously close to the drone on approach to McCarran Airport. The irresponsible drone operator then flew upside down to get a better shot of the Frontier Airlines plane. Months earlier, a DJI Phantom 4 drone flying near Staten Island, N.Y., hit a U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopter, damaging its main rotor blade because the sUAS pilot was deliberately flying beyond his visual line of sight.
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Today – maybe on the other side of the planet, maybe closer to home – cybercriminals are constantly trying to exploit the vulnerabilities of the aviation industry: connectivity, availability, legacy systems and the constant flow of payment data from passengers. Soon, 17-year-old Antonia Nunley of Columbus, Georgia might join an army of “white hats” being trained at Embry-Riddle to protect airports and airlines by combating cybercriminals. Nunley recently joined 20 other high-school students to take part in a unique aviation-focused cybersecurity camp, developed by Embry-Riddle Research Fellow and Professor of Computer Science Dr. Remzi Seker and funded by the National Security Administration.
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PRESCOTT, Ariz. – Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is proud to announce the appointment of Dr. Rhonda Capron to Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs at the Prescott Campus. Capron officially joined the university on September 25. Capron, together with campus Deans, will manage and coordinate the strategic academic portfolio on behalf of the Chancellor. She will work closely with the vice chancellors for academics at Embry-Riddle’s Worldwide and Daytona Beach campuses to coordinate the policies, procedures, and initiatives that extend across the University. 
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The Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) Higher Education Endorsement Program has provided a premier stamp of excellence in support of Embry-Riddle’s Daytona Beach, Fla., accounting program.
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Smaller, more fuel-efficient aircraft that can fly farther – such as Boeing’s 737 MAX and 787 Dreamliner and the Airbus A330 – are seeing more sales than the massive Airbus 380 or the Boeing 747, Ashley Halsey III reported in the Washington Post. To help explain this aviation business trend, Halsey called on Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University expert Bijan Vasigh. Vasigh, the author of Foundations of Airline Finance: Methodology and Practice, serves as professor of economics and finance in Embry-Riddle’s College of Business on the Daytona Beach Campus. “The most expensive part of the aircraft is the engine,” Vasigh told Halsey. “The Airbus 380 has four engines. If you don’t fill it up with 550 passengers, you may have lost your profit share.” Such a large plane can be best used by airlines carrying many passengers between large hub cities, the Washington Post article explained. For example, Dubai-based Emirates Airlines has made recent purchases of the A380. Moreover, Airbus Marketing Chief Frank Vermiere said that demand for the A380 will rise as global air travel between megacities continues to increase. Halsey’s article, “Is the Airbus 380 the future of air travel of a relic of the past?” was published by the Washington Post on Aug. 19, 2018.
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Embry-Riddle Worldwide Professor Deborah Donnelly-McLay, a United Parcel Service 767 pilot, co-authored a peer-reviewed study, with Harvard University researchers, showing how pilot performance is affected by specific carbon dioxide levels on the flight deck.
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Prescott, AZ – August 2, 2018 – Eviation, an Israeli startup pioneering the industry’s first all-electric aircraft, selected Prescott for its US corporate headquarters.  Eviation will open an office at the former Guidance Aviation building, at the Prescott Municipal Airport in August.
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PRESCOTT, Ariz. – Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI) attendees from around the world recently gathered at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Prescott Campus to discuss, simulate, analyze and problem-solve at AABI’s annual meeting.
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Dr. Richard “Pat” Anderson, director of the Eagle Flight Research Center at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, described efforts to shape the future of aviation, during the Lindbergh Innovation Forum at the 2018 EAA AirVenture show.
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Armed with small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS), 16 Embry-Riddle students are completing photogrammetric work in support of cultural heritage preservation at a half-dozen sites in Kosovo, as part of a study abroad program this summer.
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For the eighth straight year, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has been selected as one of the Great Colleges to Work For by The Chronicle of Higher Education, the nation’s most respected publication covering colleges and universities.
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A special article collection on the human side of autonomous driving features Embry-Riddle research that looks at how positive and negative media portrayals of driverless vehicles affect consumer perceptions of the technology. The article collection, published by Elsevier and freely available until Dec. 31, 2018, covers six levels of automation, from none to hands-off driving. The editors note, however, that “regardless of the level of automation we reach, there will always be a human side to autonomous driving, whether it’s the psychology behind getting people into self-driving cars or the policy implications of the technology.” In a pair of Embry-Riddle studies, people were more willing to ride in driverless vehicles after hearing positive information about them, and less willing to ride after hearing negative information. Because people from India are significantly more willing to ride in driverless vehicles compared to Americans, the researchers also looked at the effect of nationality on an individual’s willingness to forego a human driver. Females from India had the highest willingness-to-ride scores, researchers found. The Embry-Riddle team was directed by Scott Winter, a faculty member in the College of Aviation’s School of Graduate Studies, and colleague Stephen Rice of the College of Arts and Sciences’ Human Factors and Behavioral Neurobiology Department on Embry-Riddle’s Daytona Beach, Fla., Campus. Student Emily Anania served as first author of the research. Co-authors were students Nathan Walters, Matthew Pierce and Mattie Milner.
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