CubSat1

Clayton Jacobs, Doug Granger and Zach Henney with EagleSat at CBSF in Ft. Sumner, N.M.

Run by NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) and Louisiana State University, the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) program launches 12 student payloads to 125,000 feet 

Prescott Campus Students Launch CubeSat on High-Altitude Balloon

Thu Aug 14, 2014 at 10:25 AM

CubSat1

Clayton Jacobs, Doug Granger and Zach Henney with EagleSat at CBSF in Ft. Sumner, N.M.

Run by NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) and Louisiana State University, the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) program launches 12 student payloads to 125,000 feet on a high-altitude balloon — and for the second year, the launch, which took place Aug. 9 in Ft. Sumner, N.M., included work from Embry-Riddle students.

For their second pre-launch test flight last week, students at the Prescott Campus traveled to the CSBF campus in Palestine, Texas, to fly their EagleSat CubeSat in a high-altitude balloon that mimics the low-pressure/high-fluctuation temperatures of space (temperatures swinging between -50ºF and 125ºF).

CubeSat2

Clayton Jacobs, Zach Henney and Professor Jack Crabtree at the recovery site north of Leupp, Ariz.

By flying EagleSat on HASP, it is possible to test the satellite for up to 20 hours in a near-space environment.

The student team consisted of Aaron Petrek, a senior Computer Engineering student; Clayton Jacobs, an Electrical Engineering senior and manager of the EagleSat program; and Zach Henney, a senior Aerospace Engineering student and manager of the Embry-Riddle HASP program.

After successfully completing testing in Palestine, Jacobs and Henney continued on to Ft. Sumner with their mentor, Professor Jack Crabtree, where EagleSat was installed onto HASP prior to the flight. This year's flight flew for eight and a half hours before landing just north of Leupp, Ariz.

Now that the flight is over, analysis has begun on the data from EagleSat, which will be compiled into a final science report as part of the HASP program.

For more information on HASP or EagleSat, contact Clayton Jacobs at clayton.jacobs@my.erau.edu or Zach Henney at zachary.henney@my.erau.edu.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, the world’s largest, fully accredited university specializing in aviation and aerospace, is a nonprofit, independent institution offering more than 70 baccalaureate, master’s and Ph.D. degree programs in its colleges of Arts & Sciences, Aviation, Business, Engineering and Security & Intelligence. Embry-Riddle educates students at residential campuses in Daytona Beach, Fla., and Prescott, Ariz., through the Worldwide Campus with more than 150 locations in the United States, Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and through online programs. The university is a major research center, seeking solutions to real-world problems in partnership with the aerospace industry, other universities and government agencies. For more information, visit http://www.embryriddle.edu, follow us on Twitter (@EmbryRiddle) and facebook.com/EmbryRiddleUniversity, and find expert videos at YouTube.com/EmbryRiddleUniv.

Media Contact

Jason Kadah

Communications & Media Relations Manager, Prescott, Ariz.
Office: (928) 777-6731
jason.kadah@erau.edu